March 14, 2009

Puto

One night, I told two of my ex-roommates that I was craving puto really bad. They stood there and stared me with a shocked look. What? I know it's not the healthiest thing to eat, but it's so good. They informed me that puto is a rather unsavory word in the spanish language. Oh? It's funny that such a word is used for a great dessert.

I can't remember the last time I had puto. It's probably been 7 years or so.It's one of my favorite filipino desserts. Puto is a steamed rice cake that can be flavored with a number of ingredients.The addition of ube or pandan gives the puto a different flavor as well as give it color.Even the addition of cheese makes it a very special treat.

The type of container used to make the puto does not matter. They do make special puto cups, but they are not necessary.


Putong Puti

1 cup rice flour
1/3 cup sugar
pinch of salt
1 tsp. baking powder
1 cup coconut milk
1 Tbs. water

Combine the rice flour,sugar,baking powder, and salt. Mix in coconut milk and water until well combined.Fill your desired containers 2/3 full. Steam for 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.

19 comments:

doggybloggy said...

pushing puto makes you a pimp - I have all the ingredients and I am making it today and will post it later...

Carolyn Jung said...

I can't say that I've ever heard of puto before. But they remind me a little of those steamed Chinese sponge cakes I adored as a child.

Anonymous said...

Your story reminds me of when I was younger and brought some puto to sell at the church bake sale. Father Michael asked everyone what they made when he got to me I proudly proclaimed "Puto!" He was so shocked and flabergasted he said are you sure, isn't that a bad word. I innocently said no, it's cake. :)

5 Star Foodie said...

I've never heard of puto but it sounds really good! I would love to make it sometime too.

Tangled Noodle said...

Thank you for this recipe! I've been looking for a nice, easy one (no pun intended!) since I've had to rely on boxed mixes. Puto and dinuguan - what a combo!

Nila Rosa said...

doggybloggy: Well, you know, it's how I roll. :P Enjoy! :)

Carolyn Jung:They may be the same thing. Filipino cuisine is influenced by many other cultures.

Anonymous: That was a funny story :) Thank you for sharing.

5 star: It's one of my favorite filipino treats. So simple, but so delicious.

Tangled Noodle: I bought a boxed puto mix awhile ago, but I haven't used it yet. Not sure why. I've heard of using bisquick to make them too.

hmm..now you have me craving pinakbet.

Maggie said...

They looks so soft and fluffy! I bet they smell great steaming too.

oysterculture said...

Like 5 Star, I never heard of puto before either, but cannot wait to try - thanks for sharing the recipe.

Nila Rosa said...

Maggie: Yes,they smelled great while steaming. They are usually eaten at room temp , but putting them in the fridge made them dense and chewy.

Oysterculture: Try it one day. You won't be disappointed. :)

Mrs. L said...

It's been so long since I've had puto. Mom used to always pick some up when she went to the local Filipino food store. There was always some at family gatherings too, when I was growing up.

staria said...

They look good! I think I'm making these today for dessert!

Jenn said...

I LOVE LOVE LOVE puto!!! Come second to halo halo. This goes great with palabok.

It's been a while since I've some some of this. You've got my mouth watering for it now. =)

pixen said...

Which type of rice flour better for this recipe?

The ready-grounded packed factory version or traditional hand grind rice? Is there any taste difference? Most elderly folks told me that hand grinded rice flour using the traditional method of granite grinder tasted heaven!

Thing is... such stone/granite grinder is difficult to find. Mostly not in kitchen but as antique decoration instead!

lilaznjewel said...

Hi!! I got a question!! How would you recommend storing these?? I can't wait to make these!

Nila Rosa said...

lilaznjewel: I recommend storing them at room temperature in a resealable container. Because it is made of rice flour, I don't recommend storing them in the refrigerator since it will get hard like cold rice. Enjoy!

Justine said...

do you know how to do this without a steamer?

Anna said...

Hi,

I follow this recipe to a t. I used Mochiko rice flour (glutinous). I steamed them for 20 minutes, but they did not puff up and stayed gummy like. I tried steaming them longer, but they still stay gummy. Am I suppose to use a different rice flour?

Thanks!

Sildenafil said...

Incredible, they are very interesting to make and I wonder if I could prepare some at home, just to make wonder to all my family.

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